Why I Hate Councils…

A great grandfather is seen crawling upstairs in a shocking video because council bosses won’t fit a stairlift

Dundee City Council says a stairlift would be a health and safety hazard because he shares a home with his young grandson.

Gordon Fraser, 73, suffers a neurological condition called torsion dystonia, which limits his movement and speech.

He has fallen downstairs three times since he moved in with daughter Lucy, in Dundee, after the death of his wife in January.

But the council says that because there’s a child under 10 in the house, which would be too risky.

Source: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/health/elder/12206757/Shocking-video-shows-great-grandad-crawling-upstairs-because-council-bosses-wont-fit-a-stairlift.html

Linux Gaming Setup Part 2: Software configs, Nvidia binary driver, bumblebee, steam and playonlinux howto – Out Here In The Field : Persistence

I decided to make a second part of my Linux gaming setup post, as I feel that the first one is more like a list of stuff that are on top my desk. Anyway, once you’re done with hardware, let&#…

Source: Linux Gaming Setup Part 2: Software configs, Nvidia binary driver, bumblebee, steam and playonlinux howto – Out Here In The Field : Persistence

This is what reading is like if you have dyslexia – CNN.com

Ever wondered what it’s like having dyslexia? This site will help you see. And this gif shows you at a glance what it’s like.

The person’s blog has been setup for letters to “jump around” like what sufferer’s see. If you find it hard to read, imagine what the sufferer’s have to cope with on a daily basis. Sure, you can probably adapt to it after a period – like reading mirror letters or reading another language. Heck, you could probably read Al Bhed fluently, given enough time. But unlike dyslexia, all the other languages are static – they don’t change constantly.

I used to wonder why dyslexic people had an extra 30 minutes in exams when I was at school. Seeing this helps me understand why. Just being told “the letters jump around” didn’t really help me grasp the size of the task sufferer’s had to put up with.

I had dyslexic school mates and they were often shunned because they were considered “slow” readers. Unfortunately, this mindset carried on throughout our school life, and although they were slower at reading they were amazing at absorbing the information they read, doing really well at their exams (with the extra 30 minutes of course). That itself silenced their bullies.

Source: This is what reading is like if you have dyslexia – CNN.com