Broadband Speeds

You may have known I really hate my broadband speeds. I’ve replaced the ADSL filters, the phone extension coil and the router, and was still getting barely 1Mb on a 4Mb connection from Sky.

The only cable I hadn’t yet replaced was the cable that went from my router to the extension coil. Without hoping for much, I spent £2 and got a “high quality” (always be careful with any listing that says that) so I decided to buy two while I was at it.

It arrived and I swapped out the cable. Then tested it.

Well….

The router claims connection speed as 7007 kbps down and 921 kbps up.

Ookla says:

An improvement over barely 1Mbps, but still below the 7007 kbps down claimed by the router….

Using the “change-cause” Kubernetes annotation as a changelog

Suppose you have an application you are deploying to your kubernetes cluster. For most purposes, running kubectl rollout history deployments/your-app will give you a very simple revision history.

$ kubectl rollout history deployments/awesome-app
REVISION  CHANGE-CAUSE
1         <none>

However, what if you had multiple deployments by different people. How would you know what was the reason for the deployment? Especially when you have something like this?

REVISION  CHANGE-CAUSE
1         <none>
2
3
4
5
...
...
100       <none>
101       <none>
102       <none>

It is possible to set a value into the change-cause field via an annotation, but that field is quite volatile, it is also filled/replaced if someone uses the --record flag when doing an apply. However, it can be utilised to make it much more useful:

REVISION  CHANGE-CAUSE
11        Deploy new version of awesome-app to test environment
12        Deploy new version of awesome-app to staging environment
13        Deploy new version of awesome-app, Thu 21 Jun 07:01:03 BST 2018
14        Deploy new version of awesome-app with integration to gitlab v0.0.0 [test]

How is this done? Pretty simply, actually. here’s a snippet from the deploy script I use.

echo Deploy message?
read MESSAGE
if [ -z "$MESSAGE" ]; then
  MESSAGE="Deploy new version of awesome-app, $(date)"
  echo Blank message detected, defaulting to \"$MESSAGE\"
fi
echo Deploy updates...
cat deploy.yaml | sed s/'SUB_TIMESTAMP'/"$(date)"/g | kubectl replace -f -
kubectl annotate deployment awesome-app kubernetes.io/change-cause="$MESSAGE" --record=false --overwrite=true
kubectl rollout status deployments/awesome-app
kubectl rollout history deployment awesome-app

For lines 1 to 6, I read in a message from the terminal to populate the annotation, and if nothing is provided, a default is used.
On line 8, I replace the timestamp to trigger a change to the deployment (this can be anything, for example, changing the version tag of your docker image from awesome-app:release-1.0 to awesome-app:release-1.1)

Note that I used replace and not applyreplace will reset the deployment declaration, and since my deploy yaml does NOT contain a change-cause annotation, replace will remove the annotation.

On line 9, I annotate the deployment, making sure I don’t record it and overwrite the annotation in the event it’s there already (though those two switches might be redundant)

On line 10 I check the status of the rollout — this blocks until it is complete

On line 11, I then dump the deployment history.

This is an example of a script run:

$ ./deploy.sh
Deploy message?
[typed] Deploy new version of awesome-app with gitlab integration v0.0.0 [test]
Deploy updates...
deployment "awesome-app" replaced
deployment "awesome-app" annotated
Waiting for rollout to finish: 1 old replicas are pending termination...
deployment "awesome-app" successfully rolled out
deployments "awesome-app"
REVISION  CHANGE-CAUSE
11        Deploy new version of awesome-app, Thu 21 Jun 07:00:19 BST 2018
12        Deploy new version of awesome-app, Thu 21 Jun 07:00:52 BST 2018
13        Deploy new version of awesome-app, Thu 21 Jun 07:01:03 BST 2018
14        Deploy new version of awesome-app with integration to gitlab v0.0.0 [test]

Microsoft to Acquire GitHub

Sad news that M$ are to acquire GitHub. I suspect I’ll start getting Windows adverts in my email inbox soon as my office uses GitHub

On the plus side, this LinuxJournal article has proposed some alternatives. GitLab is a good one and even mentioned on some job listings so I guess I’ll move my repos there.

I’ll be removing my GitHub repos…

https://www.linuxjournal.com/content/microsoft-reportedly-acquire-github

%d bloggers like this: