New Ubuntu Quirks

So, I install Ubuntu 17 clean on my laptop after the issues I had with drivers and immediately found out that gksu was not installed.

Installed that and tried to

gksudo nautilus

That failed and found out that Wayland had replaced the default of Xorg. Found an old Xauthority file from my backups and copied that back, which allowed me to get the popup window back for my gksu, but I couldn’t click it to enter the password 😦

Then I found this article:

https://www.linuxuprising.com/2018/04/gksu-removed-from-ubuntu-heres.html

Which tells me I need to use the admin:/// file prefix instead to open something up as admin. Guess I’ll give it a go later.

Random Thought…

There’s a thought experiment known as Theseus’s paradox (and a couple of variants) and it goes something like this.

If you have a raft and replace the oars and planks due to them rotting or being old, or similar, to such a level that the entire raft is eventually replaced, is it still the same ship?

If you inherited an axe from your uncle and you replace the axe head because it’s blunt, and then the wooden handle because it broke — is that axe still the same one you inherited? Can you still call it your uncle’s axe?

Similarly, if all parts of a computer program are replaced by patches/hotfixes (not as full releases), is it still the same program? Can you, for example, call Microsoft Excel V1 a V1 if every part of it has been replaced with new code through patches and hotfixes? Can you even call it Microsoft Excel?

Tunnelling to Kubernetes Nodes & Pods via a Bastion

A quick note to remind myself (and other people) how to tunnel to a node (or pod) in Kubernetes via the bastion server

rm ~/.ssh/known_hosts #Needed if you keep scaling the bastion up/down

BASTION=bastion.{cluster-domain}
DEST=$1

ssh -o StrictHostKeyChecking=no -o ProxyCommand='ssh -o StrictHostKeyChecking=no -W %h:%p admin@bastion.{cluster-domain}' admin@$DEST

Run like this:

bash ./tunnelK8s.sh NODE_IP

Example:

bash ./tunnelK8s.sh 10.10.10.100 #Assuming 10.10.10.100 is the node you want to connect to.

You can extend this by using this to ssh into a pod, assuming the pod has an SSH server on it.

BASTION=bastion.${cluster domain name}
NODE=$1
NODEPORT=$2
PODUSER=$3

ssh -o ProxyCommand="ssh -W %h:%p admin@$BASTION" admin@$NODE ssh -tto StrictHostKeyChecking=no $PODUSER@localhost -p $NODEPORT

So if you have service listening on port 32000 on node 10.10.10.100 that expects a login user of "poduser", you would do this:

bash ./tunnelPod.sh 10.10.10.100 32000 poduser

If you have to pass a password you can install sshpass on the node, then use that (be aware of security risk though – this is not an ideal solution)

ssh -o ProxyCommand="ssh -W %h:%p admin@$BASTION" admin@$NODE sshpass -p ${password} ssh -tto StrictHostKeyChecking=no $PODUSER@localhost -p $NODEPORT

Caveat though — you will have to make sure that your node security group allows your bastion security group to talk to the nodes on the additional ports. By default, the only port that the bastions are able to talk to the node security groups on is SSH (22) only.

Facebook Privacy (or lack of)

Facebook have been having a lot of bad publicity lately (and I would personally say it’s long overdue) and a lot of it over privacy. Now, there’s talk about Facebook lifting SMS and phone call information from Android phones with consent. Yes, Facebook asks for it, but you can (and should) refuse it access.

Later versions of Android allow you to revoke and change the permissions given to an app, and also prompt you again if the app asks for it.

My Facebook app has very little permissions on my device because I don’t trust it a single bit.

I also have Privacy Guard enabled and restricted. Whenever it wants to know my location, I can refuse it.

Cloud Native Computing Foundation Announces Kubernetes as First Graduated Project

SONOMA, Calif., March 6, 2018 – Open Source Leadership Summit – The Cloud Native Computing Foundation® (CNCF®), which sustains and integrates open source technologies like Kubernetes® and Prometheus™, today announced that Kubernetes is the first project to graduate. To move from incubation to graduate, projects must demonstrate thriving adoption, a documented, structured governance process, and a strong commitment to community success and inclusivity.

https://www.cncf.io/announcement/2018/03/06/cloud-native-computing-foundation-announces-kubernetes-first-graduated-project/

Great news 🙂 shows that Kubernetes is now considered more mature than previously and it definitely shows.

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