Wix gets caught “stealing” GPL code from WordPress | Ars Technica

Well… “stealing”? I guess it depends on how you interpret the GPL.  Nonetheless bottom line is — if you are going to use GPL code, your code and product must follow the same license. i.e.

“… if you’re going to embed GPL stuff in your code and produce a derivative product, you’re going to have to make that derivative compliant with GPL—either by shipping the code with it or providing the code on request”

So, the headline of “stealing” GPL code? Can you actually “steal” code that is open source? Using open source in a closed source product would be a violation of the GPL (which I believe is what’s being talked about here), but is that “stealing”?

I’m not siding with either side here, I’m just not sure the word “stealing” is the right phrase to use in this headling here, quoted or not. Guess that’s clickbait for you….

Source: Wix gets caught “stealing” GPL code from WordPress | Ars Technica

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Using a WordPress theme? You might want to read this … | Sherry Holub | LinkedIn

As of January 2015, more than 23.3% of the top 10 million websites are using WordPress (source). To say it’s a popular choice for a content management system is an understatement. Part of its appeal are the thousands of free and commercial, pre-made themes available for the system. They are an enticing way to publish a website with little or no knowledge of programming required.

It helps to understand the motivation different parties may have in creating a WordPress theme for sale or free download.

Individual programmers are often motivated to create a theme to upload it to a site that sells them at low cost. Much like a stock photo, think of these themes as stock themes. You pay a fee that is a fraction of the cost of hiring a professional to create a custom design and theme, you download it for your website, and the individual programmer gets a small cut of that fee. With free themes, the original programmer usually requires that a link back to them appear on the site, gaining them more internet exposure.

However, there’s also a third, more nefarious reason for creating free themes – to spread malware and other malicious code. That’s right, some unscrupulous individuals will code nasty stuff right into a theme hoping to cash in on the popularity of themes and the ease of installing them, as well as uneducated or uninformed user. So how do you avoid this one? Of course I’d recommend going custom (more on that shortly), but if you’re determined to use a pre-made theme, be careful where you get them. There are several popular sites that sell themes, and WordPress.org has a directory of themes. Those are your best bets but you often have little recourse if you purchase or download a free theme and install it yourself any of these occur:

  • you manage to screw something up on the site
  • your site is hacked
  • your site is flagged by Google for containing malware

 

Using a WordPress theme? You might want to read this … | Sherry Holub | LinkedIn.

Striking Back Against Censorship

The WordPress.com Blog

The mission of WordPress.com is to democratize publishing. We’re inspired every day by the ways creators use our platform to bring their voices to the world. Unfortunately, we also see many cases of censorship aimed at WordPress.com authors and users.

One area where we’ve seen a number of problems is the censoring of criticism through abuse of copyright law. Two recentcases of abuse really caught our attention and made us think that we needed to take action to fight back on behalf of our users and everyone who believes in the internet’s promise for free expression.

Censorship by DMCA

A common form of censorship by copyright stems from improper use of legal creations called DMCA takedown notices. The DMCA stands for the “Digital Millennium Copyright Act,” which is a US federal law that created a system for protecting copyrights online. The DMCA system works pretty well, but has a…

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